Jungian Theory: A Brief Overview, I

From the start, Jung’s work included an interest in myth, symbolism, ritual, and the numinous.[1] Jung became a student of Sigmund Freud in 1906, however, the mentoring relationship ended in 1913 because of their professional differences.[2] Jung’s central issue with Freud’s method of psychoanalysis was its exclusivity and one-sided interpretations, which, he felt, left Freudian…

Overcoming Psychological Struggle: Introduction

Murray Stein refers to Swiss psychotherapist Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961) as an “explorer and mapmaker” of the psyche and describes Jung’s psychotherapeutic method as a “map of the soul” focused on the psychic interplay between wounding and healing.[1] Through experiences of conflict (large and small), the world wounds an individual and severs the inner connection…

3 More Objections to Jungian Literary Criticism

My previous post outline three objections against a Jungian approach to literary analysis. This post offers three more: Objection 4: Jungian literary criticism is nothing more than source hunting, or finding the external sources of a text. While “[t]he discovery of the presence of mythic elements is a beginning,” Brown states, “identification [of these mythic…

3 Objections to a Jungian Approach to Literature

My previous post presented two examples of a Jungian approach to The Master and Margarita and offers my addition to a Jungian interpretation of the novel. Gareth Williams warns that while “some of the more puzzling issues raised by the novel” may be interpreted psychologically as Bulgakov’s desire to express “this or that painful aspect…