Interpreting Dream Language, II

My last post dealt provided a brief introduction to Jung’s understanding of dreams and dream interpretation. The following post finishes this introduction by discussing Jung’s requirements for undertaking the interpretation of symbols and archetypes that make up dream content (as well as the content found in active imagination).   In looking at dreams as texts,…

Interpreting Dream Language, I

My previous posts described the nature and content of symbols and archetypes, unconscious material that helps make internal, psychic conflict available and understandable to the individual in whom a psychological crisis occurs. The next two series of posts address how to interpret symbols and archetypes so as to make sense of our unconscious material and…

The Language of the Unconscious, I: Symbols

My previous two posts presented an overview of dreams and active imagination, and discussed the role dreams and active imagination play in the psyche. This post, and the following post, define how the psyche speaks to an individual in dreams and active imagination: through symbols and archetypes (personifications of unconscious material) that dramatize the conflict…

Dreams & Active Imagination, I: Overview

My previous series of posts discussed the four elements, three stages, and the goal of the process of adaption and restoration (i.e., the process C.G. Jung called individuation). Jung observed adaption and restoration at work in the psychological lives of his patients, and developed his theory based on the manner in which psychological conflict manifested…

Adaption & Restoration, IV: Goal of Integration

My previous posts provided overviews of elements and stages associated with the process of individuation. The question remains: what is the aim of these elements and stages within the process of adaption and restoration?   The goal of the stages of differentiation, confrontation, and reunion (in combination with the elements of quest, unity in multiplicity,…

Adaption & Restoration, III: Stages

My previous post outlined four elements commonly associated with the process of adaption and restoration. These four elements (projection, quest, unity in multiplicity, and the persona) move through three stages (differentiation, confrontation, and reunion) in order to help an individual gradually separate her-/himself from the persona, confront the depths of unconscious activity, and reconcile the…